Happy Chanukah!

Holiday art by some of our members.

Click on the images to enlarge

Mark Podwal, “Hanukkah Lamp with Bisons”. In this drawing of a Hanukkah menorah, bisons replace the traditional lions since numerous bisons freely roam the Białowieża Forest, 39 miles southeast of Białystok. Many Polish companies include bisons in their logos. From the series “Kaddish for Dąbrowa Białostocka” to be exhibited at the Terezin Ghetto Museum in spring 2020.

Archie Rand, “Hanukkah 1”. Rand is the 2020 Farash Fellow for the Advancement of Jewish Humanities and Culture, sponsored by the Max and Marian Farash Charitable Foundation. His current exhibition “Rand / McBee / Silverstein: Modern Jewish Narratives” is on view at the Hyams Museum until February 28th.

Frann Addison‘s artwork is not your grandmother’s dreidel! Unlike your traditional spinning top, this one-of-a-kind dreidel by Frann Addison incorporates an antique enamel watch face and a clock hand that spins, pointing to a Hebrew letter, indicating what to do next in the game. Will you take half? Perhaps you will take all! You will have fun when you take the “TIME to Spin”!

Yitzchok Moully‘s Light Over Darkness mural. “On each of the eight nights of Chanukah, different Jersey City artists and community leaders will paint a large flame on another branch of his menorah. This is in response to the December 10 violence there that left 6 people dead. May we all only experience positivity and light in our lives.”⁣

Yoram Raanan‘s “Menorah Burning“, acylic on canvas with collage and gold leaf. Raanan’s new book can be viewed here. “In the opening to his book, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks writes: “Few artists in the Jewish world today better capture the beauty of holiness, avodah and of Judaism as a faith than Yoram Raanan . . . these works of art are Yoram’s commentary to the Torah, and to the spiritual dimension of our life and Land. He helps us ‘see that it is good,’ showing us the light of holiness and the beauty of being.

Mirta Kupferminc‘s Hanukiah which she created several years ago is 2,7 meter high (= 8.9 feet). It is displayed in a roundabout at the Hacoaj country club, Argentina, and is lit every year. When turning with the car around the roundabout, there is a point at which the figure of the Menorah is shaped; soon after one only sees three separate sculptural planes.

Ruth Schreiber‘s staged photograph for “Hannah and her 7 sons” described in Maccabees II, chapter 7.

One comment

  1. Ayana Friedman-Wirtheim · ·

    Thank you for inviting me to join this art salon, many of my art works deal with Holocaust and Jewish life, including creating a special Teffilyn for women. Most of my art works can be seen on my website.

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