Trix Rosen

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Trix Rosen’s work can be found in many collections, including the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Museum. In 2016 she was invited to submit her original slide show “MAITRESSE,” along with two photographs for the exhibition catalog, to the Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition, “CLUB 57: Film, Performance and Art in the East Village, 1978-1983,” opening in New York, October 2017- April 2018. In 2015 she was invited to submit eight photographs from her HE-SHE Portfolio for the 5th THESSALONIKI BIENNALE OF CONTEMPORARY ART exhibition in Thessaloniki, Greece.

In the last six years her photographs have been represented in over 50 exhibitions in galleries and in museums including the Ceres Gallery and Hebrew Union College Museum in New York City; the Sherwin Miller Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma; the Reece Museum in Johnson City, Tennessee; New Jersey’s George Segal Gallery in Montclair and Pierro Gallery in South Orange; and the Kepco Gallery Museum in Seoul, South Korea.

The scope of her art is driven by a desire to make a difference through addressing social justice issues that can transform local and global perspectives. Much of her work challenges the viewer to explore how we perceive masculinity, sexuality and gender ambiguity.

“I was born in Brooklyn and raised in a conservative Jewish home. Yet it was not until much later in my adult life that I realized how much my Jewish childhood and education had shaped my art, vision, values and identity. My portfolio, DIVINE LIGHT, (http://www.trixrosen.com/divine-light/index.html) gathers some of the work that more explicitly embodies my Jewish spiritual path.

 

View artists posts here.

http://trixrosen.com

http://www.trixrosenphotography.com

trix@trixrosen.com

One comment

  1. […] Trix Rosen’s five evocative photographs examine individual identity and gender ambiguity pressing beyond the public and private parameters of self-liberation. In the portrait ‘CHANGED LANDSCAPES’, (image left) Rosen expands the convergence of unconfined boundaries querying “what should be made public and what should remain private”. […]

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